Friday, November 2, 2012

4th Grade Matisse Inspired Polynesian Figures in Collage


 
Fourth grade artists discussed and explored the colorful, joy-filled paintings and collages of artist, Henri Matisse.
 
Matisse helped pioneer the field of collage and the application of unbridled color to realistic subject matter, earning the nickname, color fauve, or “wild beast of colors,” and cultivating the art style of Fauvism.  His works were filled with bright colors and whimsical shapes cut from painted papers then glued back together to create a collage that expressed happiness and lively movement. Fourth grade artists studied the cultures of various Polynesian Island tribes and created motion filled dancers using similar collage techniques.

Students experienced a work of art through the senses (using large gestures to illustrate movement) and emotions (application of shape/color family in the style of Fauvism) then discussed and visually represented that experience in their art work. (Write up by: J.Stegner)











 
During the lesson, I shared this funny story, a parody of the two famous artists, Matisse & Picasso. Students enjoyed hearing the story and seeing the artworks the illustrator used to tell the story!
This art lesson covered the new Ohio Art Standards below:

Perceiving (5PE): The student experienced a work of art through senses (using large gestures to illustrate movement) and emotions (application of shape/color family in the style of Fauvism) then discussed and visually represented that experience in their art work.

Reflecting (4RE): The student responded to the Polynesian artworks in context and described the relationship to their social and cultural settings through culturally representative costume choice, props, and movement represented in their personal artwork.
 
 

 
 
 
 

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